Our Services

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our Services

Diagnosis and treatment of vascular and venous disease

We treat a variety of vascular conditions, from diagnostics to surgery. Treatments are office-based, minimally invasive and tailored to each patient's individual needs.

Thoracic/Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA)

What is Thoracic/Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm?

A thoracic or abdominal aortic aneurysm occurs when the aorta increases to approximately 1.5 times its normal size. There are rarely symptoms, however, patients may experience abdominal, leg or back pain. An aneurysm can cause the aorta to rupture, which leads to approximately 15,000 deaths per year.

Risk factors

•Age 65+

•Family history

•High blood pressure

•Plaque buildup in the arteries

•Smoking

Treatment

Treatment options include open repair or endovascular surgery. In an open repair, a surgeon makes an incision in the abdomen to expose the aorta. A graft is then placed to repair the aneurysm. With a minimally-invasive endovascular repair, there is no abdominal incision and patients often stay only one night in the hospital.

Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD)

What is Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD)?

Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) is a circulatory disease which causes narrowing of the arteries, reducing blood flow to the limbs and increasing the chance of ulcers or gangrene. Patients who have PAD may notice cramping or a tired feeling in the leg or hip during activity. Patients with severe PAD may have pain in the legs or feet at rest.

Risk factors

•Age

•Diabetes

•Family history

•High blood pressure

•High cholesterol

•History of heart disease or stroke

Diagnosis & Treatment

Diagnosis
PAD is typically diagnosed through a blood pressure test and a sonogram. Medication and lifestyle changes help manage the disease.

Treatment
In severe cases, a patient may require an angiogram, angioplasty, stent or in some cases bypass surgery.

Venous Disease (including Varicose Veins and Spider Veins)

Venous insufficiency is a condition in which veins have difficulty sending blood from the legs back to the heart. This can lead to varicose veins or spider veins.

What are Varicose Veins?

Varicose veins are bulging or twisted veins that are dark purple or blue in color. In addition to appearance, patients may experience an achy or heavy feeling in the leg or throbbing, cramping, swelling, itchiness or pain after long periods of sitting or standing.

What are Spider Veins?

Spider veins are different from varicose veins. They are smaller and closer to the skin’s surface.

Risk factors

•Age

•Gender

•Family history

•Pregnancy

Treatment

There are a variety of treatment options for venous disease. Each treatment is customized to the patient, and we strive for minimally-invasive techniques whenever possible. Treatment options include:

Endovenous ablation – A thin catheter is inserted into the vein and is heated to seal the vein shut. This prevents blood from refluxing toward the lower leg.

Sclerotherapy – Injections into the veins to minimize their appearance.

Microphlebectomies – Veins that are too large for injections are removed through small incisions.

Deep Vein Thrombosis

What is Deep Vein Thrombosis?

Deep Vein Thrombosis is a blood clot in a vein in the leg. Symptoms can include leg pain or swelling or pain in the calf or foot. There may be no symptoms. A clot can get loose and travel to the lungs, creating a blockage.

Risk factors

•Age

•Cancer

•Inflammatory Bowel Disease

•Family history

•Obesity

•Pregnancy

•Previous injury to veins

•Prolonged bed rest (inactivity)

•Smoking

Treatment

Deep Vein Thrombosis can be treated with medication or minimally invasive surgery.

Carotid Artery Disease

What is Carotid Artery Disease?

Carotid Artery Disease is caused by cholesterol buildup in the blood vessels that go to the brain. This can lead to a stroke or stroke-like symptoms.

Risk factors

•Age

•Diabetes

•Family history

•High cholesterol

•High blood pressure

•Obesity

•Smoking

Treatment

Treatment for Carotid Artery Disease includes medication and continued ultrasound monitoring. When a blockage becomes severe, we may recommend carotid stenting or a carotid endarterectomy. Carotid stenting is a procedure in which the surgeon places a small stent in the artery to widen it. In a carotid endarterectomy, the surgeon opens and cleans the artery. Vascular & Endovascular Center of WNY is one of only 30 centers in the country taking part in TCAR (TransCarotid Artery Revascularization), a national study that allows for safer carotid stenting.

Permanent Access for Hemodialysis

What is Permanent Access for Hemodialysis?

Vascular access is critical for kidney failure patients needing hemodialysis. It’s a surgically created access point used by patients to receive hemodialysis. To create the access, your vascular surgeon may do one or more of the following:

Arterio-Venous Fistula – An AV fistula is typically placed in the arm to connect an artery to a vein. The fistula creates increased blood flow in the vein, making it larger for easier access to blood vessels.

Arterio-Venous Grafts – A plastic tube connects the artery to the vein.

Noninvasive Vascular Diagnostic Lab

What is our Noninvasive Vascular Diagnostic Lab?

In addition to surgical procedures, we have a noninvasive vascular diagnostic lab. We’re proud to be an Intersocietal Accreditation Commission (IAC-Vascular) accredited facility providing:

Aortic Ultrasound – to rule out aortic aneurysm

Aneurysm Screening – to screen for potential aneurysms in other areas of the body

AV Fistula Surveillance – for patients on dialysis

Carotid Artery Doppler – to look for narrowing of the carotid arteries

Peripheral Artery Testing – to test for Periphery Artery Disease (PAD)

Venous Doppler – to screen for deep vein thrombosis and venous insufficiency